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Article Dans Une Revue Molecules Année : 2020

Suitability and Modification of Different Renewable Materials as Feedstock for Sustainable Flame Retardants

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Résumé

Due to their chemical structure, conventional flame retardants are often toxic, barely biodegradable and consequently neither healthy nor environmentally friendly. Their use is therefore increasingly limited by regulations. For this reason, research on innovative flame retardants based on sustainable materials is the main focus of this work. Wheat starch, wheat protein, xylan and tannin were modified with phosphate salts in molten urea. The functionalization leads to the incorporation of phosphates (up to 48 wt.%) and nitrogen (up to 22 wt.%). The derivatives were applied on wood fibers and tested as flame retardants. The results indicate that these modified biopolymers can provide the same flame-retardant performances as commercial compounds currently used in the wood fiber industry. Besides, the flame retardancy smoldering effects may also be reduced compared to unmodified wood fibers depending on the used biopolymer. These results show that different biopolymers modified in phosphate/urea systems are a serious alternative to conventional flame retardants.
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Dates et versions

hal-02998615 , version 1 (10-11-2020)

Licence

Paternité - CC BY 4.0

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Stefan Gebke, Katrin Thümmler, Rodolphe Sonnier, Sören Tech, Andre Wagenführ, et al.. Suitability and Modification of Different Renewable Materials as Feedstock for Sustainable Flame Retardants. Molecules, 2020, 25 (21), pp.5122. ⟨10.3390/molecules25215122⟩. ⟨hal-02998615⟩
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